Healing Habitat

Planting seeds of wild literacy

Plant with nature

Gardening with nature means a lot less work! For example, if you read your microclimate and plant for local conditions rather than in spite of them, you'll water less! If you add to the bigger landscape you are a part of by planting native plants - local pollinators, birds and wildlife will come. If you leave fall tree leaves on site they will feed your soil. There are many ways to do your part as a key part of nature!

Environmental literacy is defined as "an individual's understanding, skills, and motivation to make responsible decisions that consider their relationships to natural systems, communities and future generations." - No Oregon Child Left Inside Act, 2009

Wild literacy

Wild literacy happens when we get to know a place and become a part of it. Getting to know and notice your local flora and fauna leads to a feeling of ease, and opens up connections that over time become not unlike dear friends.

Workshop

Oaks for Climate

Planting for a climate resilient future? Higher summer temperatures, reduced snow pack and winters as wet as ever have arrived in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon white oak is well adapted to areas that are very wet in the winter and hot and dry in the summer. They also provide food and shelter for over 200 species, big and small! If you have an open patch with full-sun, consider ‘oakscaping.’

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Consultation

Garden Habitat Coach

Guidance for DIY gardeners working to restore habitat by adding a patch of native plants in your yard.

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Consultation

TRE® Tune Up

TRE® (Tension & Trauma Release Exercises) is a simple and profound practice of deep tension relief that you can use any time – and anywhere – to shed accumulated stress. Give it a try and see how it feels!

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By Request

Nature Skills for Youth

Shelter, water, fire, food – that’s the survival order dude.

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Workshop

Restorative Garden Habitat

Ready to plant habitat for pollinators, birds and people where you live?  Naturescaping describes a patch of yard that is planted with 3-5 canopy layers of majority native plants. In the Pacific Northwest, we have an astonishing variety of native plants to choose from! Learn to read your microclimate(s), connect with your place, and make a plan to plant that welcomes nature.

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